New

Cleburne APA-73 - History

Cleburne APA-73 - History


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Cleburne

Counties in Arkansas and Alabama.

(APA-73: dp. 4.247- 1. 426'- b. 58'; dr. Ifi', s. 17 k.
cpl. 370; a. 1 5', cl. Gilliam)

Cleburne (APA-73) was launched 27 September 1944 by Consolidated Steel Corp., Wilmington, Calif., under a Maritime Commission contract; sponsored by Mrs. J. E. Trainer, acquired by the Navy 21 December 1944; and commissioned the next day, Lieutenant Commander F. T. Callaghan in command.

From 12 February 1945 to 10 June, Cleburne made two voyages from west Beast ports to conduct training in the Hawaiian Islands, returning each time with passengers and hospital patients. She sailed from San Francisco 28 June to transfer troops in the western Pacific, calling at Eniwetok, Guam, Ulithi, Okinawa ports in the Philippines, and Jinsen, Korea, before she arrived at Portland, Oreg., from the Far East 13 November. On 7 December she sailed to carry men to Shanghai and Tsingtao, China, returning to San Francisco 13 February 1946.

Cleburne arrived at Pearl Harbor 1 March 1946, and there was decommissioned 7 June 1946. After use in the atomic weapons tests at Bikini, she was towed to San Fransisco and transferred to the Maritime Commission 7 July 1947.


Cleburne APA-73 - History

USS Cleburne , a 4,247-ton Gilliam -class attack transport, was built at Wilmington, California, and was commissioned in December 1944. Between February and June the ship made two voyages to Hawaii to conduct training there and carry passengers and hospital patients back to California. In June she departed San Francisco for the western Pacific, where she shuttled troops between the central Pacific islands, the Philippines, and Korea. She returned to Portland, Oregon, in November 1945.

In December 1945 Cleburne sailed to carry troops to Shanghai and Tsingtao, China. She returned to San Francisco in February 1946 and then reported to Pearl Harbor in March to be stripped for use as a target in the atomic bomb tests at Bikini. Decommissioned in June, she survived the tests and was towed back to San Francisco and delivered to the Maritime Commission in July 1947. Placed in the reserve fleet, she was sold for scrapping in June 1965.

This page features our only view of USS Cleburne (APA-73).

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital image presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

In San Francisco Bay, California, in late 1945 or early 1946.

Donation of Boatswain's Mate First Class Robert G. Tippins, USN (Retired), 2003.


Gilliam (APA-57) Class: Photographs

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Steaming at 18 knots during trials on 28 July 1944, a few days before commissioning.
Her 5"/38 gun on the stern is pointed at the camera.

Photo No. Unknown (probably also 80-G-242729)
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

Off San Pedro, Calif., on 24 December 1944, three weeks after commissioning.

Photo No. 19-N-77259
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

Probably at San Francisco in late 1945 or early 1946.

Photo No. NH 98709
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command

At Pearl Harbor on 20 March 1946.

Photo No. 19-N-114617
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

At Pearl Harbor on 20 March 1946.

Photo No. 19-N-114615
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

At Pearl Harbor on 22 March 1946.

Photo No. 19-N-114599
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

Operation Crossroads Target Ships

Gilliam -class target ships and support ships at Pearl Harbor between the end of February and mid March 1946. The large Navy ships from bottom to top are Crittenden (APA-77), Catron (APA-71), Bracken (APA-64), Burleson (APA-67) or Niagara (APA-87), Gilliam (APA-57), Fallon (APA-83), an unidentified Liberty ship, Fillmore (APA-83), Kochab (AKS-6), and Luna (AKS-7). To the extreme upper right is the Army power barge Jacona (later YFP-1).

Photo No. 80-G-702126
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command

Underway at Pearl Harbor in a photograph backstamped 5 May 1946.
Her hull frame numbers have been painted on her side and brackets are visible on the bow and bridge for possible monitoring equipment. Note that little, if any, equipment has been removed from the ship. She was the ship closest to the detonation point of the first atomic bomb tested at Bikini and sank immediately.

Photo No. 19-N-116845
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

Off southern California on 5 October 1948 shortly before being sunk in the Demon 11 maneuvers there.
Damaged in the Bikini atomic bomb tests, she was taken to San Francisco for study and then disposed of as an exercise target.


The Mark 12 5"/38 caliber gun was a United States naval gun.

Unionpedia is a concept map or semantic network organized like an encyclopedia – dictionary. It gives a brief definition of each concept and its relationships.

This is a giant online mental map that serves as a basis for concept diagrams. It's free to use and each article or document can be downloaded. It's a tool, resource or reference for study, research, education, learning or teaching, that can be used by teachers, educators, pupils or students for the academic world: for school, primary, secondary, high school, middle, technical degree, college, university, undergraduate, master's or doctoral degrees for papers, reports, projects, ideas, documentation, surveys, summaries, or thesis. Here is the definition, explanation, description, or the meaning of each significant on which you need information, and a list of their associated concepts as a glossary. Available in English, Spanish, Portuguese, Japanese, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Polish, Dutch, Russian, Arabic, Hindi, Swedish, Ukrainian, Hungarian, Catalan, Czech, Hebrew, Danish, Finnish, Indonesian, Norwegian, Romanian, Turkish, Vietnamese, Korean, Thai, Greek, Bulgarian, Croatian, Slovak, Lithuanian, Filipino, Latvian, Estonian and Slovenian. More languages soon.

All the information was extracted from Wikipedia, and it's available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.

Google Play, Android and the Google Play logo are trademarks of Google Inc.


USS Cleburne

USS Cleburne (APA-73) arriving at Pearl Harbor Naval Station, Hawaii March 20, 1946.

Courtesy of the U.S. Navy Historical Center

Time Period

Related Entries

Our Sponsors

Major support provided through a partnership with the Arkansas Department of Parks & Tourism.

Major funding provided by the Winthrop Rockefeller Foundation.

Special thanks to the Department of Arkansas Heritage.

Additional support provided by the Arkansas Humanities Council.

Additional support provided by the Arkansas General Assembly.

Additional support provided by the Arkansas Community Foundation.

Additional support provided by the Charles M. and Joan R. Taylor Foundation Inc.

NAVIGATION

Donate

TRIBUTE GIVING

Honor or memorial gifts are an everlasting way to pay tribute to someone who has touched your life. Give a donation in someone’s name to mark a special occasion, honor a friend or colleague or remember a beloved family member. When a tribute gift is given the honoree will receive a letter acknowledging your generosity and a bookplate will be placed in a book. For more information, contact 501-918-3025 or [email protected]

The CALS Foundation is a 501(c)(3) organization. Donations made to the CALS Foundation are tax-deductible for United States federal income tax purposes. Read our Privacy Policy.


Patrick Cleburne - Franklin-Nashville Campaign:

With the loss of Atlanta, Davis instructed Hood to attack north with the goal of disrupting Sherman's supply lines to Chattanooga. Anticipating this, Sherman, who was planning his March to the Sea, dispatched forces under Thomas and Major General John Schofield to Tennessee. Moving north, Hood attempted to trap Schofield's force at Spring Hill, TN before it could unite with Thomas. Attacking at the Battle of Spring Hill, Cleburne engaged Union forces before being halted by enemy artillery. Escaping during the night, Schofield retreated to Franklin where his men built a strong set of earthworks. Arriving the next day, Hood resolved to frontally attack the Union position.

Recognizing the folly of such a move, many of Hood's commanders attempted to dissuade him of this plan. Though he opposed the attack, Cleburne commented that the enemy works were strong but that he would carry them or fall trying. Forming his division on the right of the attacking force, Cleburne advanced around 4:00 PM. Pushing ahead, Cleburne was last seen attempting to lead his men forward on foot after having his horse killed. A bloody defeat for Hood, the Battle of Franklin saw fourteen Confederate generals become casualties including Cleburne. Found on the field after the battle, Cleburne's body initially was buried at St. John's Episcopal Church near Mount Pleasant, TN. Six years later, it was moved to Maple Hill Cemetery in his adopted hometown of Helena.


Contents

World War II

From 12 February 1945 to 10 June, Cleburne made two voyages from west coast ports to conduct training in the Hawaiian Islands, returning each time with passengers and hospital patients. She sailed from San Francisco 28 June to transfer troops in the western Pacific, calling at Eniwetok, Guam, Ulithi, Okinawa, ports in the Philippines, and Jinsen, Korea. During this time the war ended.

After hostilities

Cleburne arrived at Portland, Oregon, from the Far East 13 November. On 7 December she sailed to carry men to Shanghai and Tsingtao, China, returning to San Francisco 13 February 1946.

Operation Crossroads

Cleburne arrived at Pearl Harbor 1 March 1946, and there was decommissioned 7 June 1946. After use in Operation Crossroads, the atomic weapons tests at Bikini Atoll, she was towed to San Francisco and transferred to the Maritime Commission 7 July 1947. Her final disposition is unknown.


Cleburne APA-73 - History

CLEBURNE, TEXAS. Cleburne, the county seat of Johnson County, is on U.S. Highway 67 thirty miles south of Fort Worth. Its origin and growth can be attributed to its role as a crossroads and transportation center. The site was near the earliest Johnson County road, an old wagon trail that was used by soldiers traveling from Fort Belknap to Fort Graham. The location had an excellent water source on West Buffalo Creek that attracted travelers, including cattlemen from the nearby Chisholm Trail.

The town was named in honor of Gen. Patrick R. Cleburne, under whom many of the men had fought during the Civil War. Cleburne had a post office during its first year and a newspaper, the Cleburne Chronicle, in 1868.

The importance of Cleburne as a transportation center was enhanced by the arrival of the railroad. In 1870 the population was 683 twenty years later the residents numbered 3,727. In 1881 the Gulf, Colorado and Santa Fe Railroad was completed from Fort Worth through Cleburne to Temple, and a secondary line connected Weatherford to Cleburne in 1887.

The most important industrial contribution to the city was made by the Santa Fe Railroad, which in 1898 and 1899 constructed central machine shops in Cleburne, helping to double the city's population in the 1890s. In 1882 the Chicago, Texas and Mexican Central Railway connected Cleburne to Dallas. Two additional railroads maintained terminals in the city after 1900. The Dallas, Cleburne and Southwestern Railway completed a spur to Egan in 1902, and the Trinity and Brazos Valley, commonly called the "Boll Weevil," operated out of Cleburne from 1904 to 1924. The former line was sold to the Missouri, Kansas and Texas in 1910. The track out of Cleburne was abandoned after 1920. The Burlington and Rock Island used the Boll Weevil track from 1924 until 1932, when it too was abandoned. The Interurban out of Fort Worth served Cleburne for eighteen years after 1912. A local streetcar service operated from 1911 to 1917. Cleburne was still served by Santa Fe and Amtrak in 1990.


Cleburne APA-73 - History

A Crossing of the Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe Railway and the Trinity & Brazos Valley Railroad

Cleburne became an incorporated town shortly after the Civil War, and eventually became a major transportation crossroads. The Handbook of Texas explains.

"The importance of Cleburne as a transportation center was enhanced by the arrival of the railroad. In 1870 the population was 683 twenty years later the residents numbered 3,727. In 1881 the Gulf, Colorado and Santa Fe Railroad was completed from Fort Worth through Cleburne to Temple, and a secondary line connected Weatherford to Cleburne in 1887. The most important industrial contribution to the city was made by the Santa Fe Railroad, which in 1898 and 1899 constructed central machine shops in Cleburne, helping to double the city's population in the 1890s. In 1882 the Chicago, Texas and Mexican Central Railway connected Cleburne to Dallas. Two additional railroads maintained terminals in the city after 1900. The Dallas, Cleburne and Southwestern Railway completed a spur to Egan in 1902, and the Trinity and Brazos Valley, commonly called the 'Boll Weevil', operated out of Cleburne from 1904 to 1924. The former line was sold to the Missouri, Kansas and Texas in 1910. The track out of Cleburne was abandoned after 1920. The Burlington and Rock Island used the Boll Weevil track from 1924 until 1932, when it too was abandoned. The Interurban out of Fort Worth served Cleburne for eighteen years after 1912. A local streetcar service operated from 1911 to 1917."

The Trinity & Brazos Valley (T&BV) Railroad crossed the Gulf Colorado & Santa Fe (GC&SF) Railway approximately two miles south of downtown Cleburne, and Tower 43 was established there on July 7, 1904 by the Railroad Commission of Texas (RCT). That same day, Tower 44 was established in Hillsboro where the T&BV crossed the Katy Railroad. Tower 43 was abandoned on October 11, 1932 by the successor to the T&BV, the Burlington - Rock Island (B-RI) Railroad, as explained in more detail on the Tower 44 page.

Tower 43 Site Images

Above: More than 70 years after abandonment, this GoogleEarth satellite image shows a tree line marking the right-of-way
of the T&BV near Cleburne. The precise location of Tower 43 is unknown, but it was presumably near the diamond. The
GC&SF line is now a Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) main line.
Below: This birds eye view provided by Microsoft Live Earth shows a BNSF train crossing the former T&BV right-of-way
at the site of Tower 43. The tree line angling up from the lower right corner is the T&BV ROW. The other tree line
coming in from upper right appears to be a property line associated with County Road 314.

Location Map, Tower 43

Topo USA shows the abandoned T&BV right-of-way as a dashed line (highlighted in orange above), crossing the current
BNSF main line south of Cleburne. The precise path of the T&BV west of the BNSF tracks and north into Cleburne is
unknown. Sanborn Insurance maps of Cleburne do not show details this far south of town.


Operational history

World War II

From 12 February 1945 to 10 June, Cleburne made two voyages from west coast ports to conduct training in the Hawaiian Islands, returning each time with passengers and hospital patients. She sailed from San Francisco 28 June to transfer troops in the western Pacific, calling at Eniwetok, Guam, Ulithi, Okinawa, ports in the Philippines, and Jinsen, Korea. During this time the war ended.

After hostilities

Cleburne arrived at Portland, Oregon, from the Far East 13 November. On 7 December she sailed to carry men to Shanghai and Tsingtao, China, returning to San Francisco 13 February 1946.

Operation Crossroads

Cleburne arrived at Pearl Harbor 1 March 1946, and there was decommissioned 7 June 1946. After use in Operation Crossroads, the atomic weapons tests at Bikini Atoll, she was towed to San Francisco and transferred to the Maritime Commission 7 July 1947. She was sold for scrap in June 1965.


Video, Sitemap-Video, Sitemap-Videos